Alfred Eisenstaedt

Alfred Eisenstaedt Photo

Alfred Eisenstaedt is known as “The father of photojournalism” having a straightforward maxim: “Keep it simple!” Working with minimum equipment, Eisenstaedt was the master of candid photography; capturing such stunning casual moments that leave a profound effect on viewer.

German-born American photographer, Eisenstaedt known as “Eisie” among his close friends was born on 6th December 1898 in Dirschau, West Prussia, Imperial Germany. His family moved to Berlin when he was 8 years old. Eisenstaedt was interested in photography from an early age. At the age of fourteen, Eisenstaedt received his first camera, Eastman Kodak Folding Camera. He joined German army to fight in World War I; he was wounded in 1918.

In 1920s, Eisenstaedt worked as button-and-belt salesperson. He started to work as a freelance photographer for the Pacific and Atlantic Photos, Berlin in 1928.  In 1929, Eisenstaedt became a full-time photographer, a German publication assigned him to cover Nobel Prize ceremonies.

A few years later, Eisenstaedt shot some of his famous historical photos. He captured a still of a meeting between Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini, Italy. In 1933, he came up with another distinguished yet famous still of Nazi propaganda politician, Joseph Goebbels, comrade of Hitler. In 1935, being a Jew, Eisenstaedt had to migrate to United States because of the Hitler domination.

In United States, Alfred Eisenstaedt settled in Jackson Heights, New York and worked as the staff photographer for Life Magazine. He was among the first four photojournalists hired by Life Magazine(along with Margaret Bourke-White). He produced around 90 covers for this magazine including stunning shots of Sophia Loren, Ernest Hemmingway and other famous figures and royalties.

Among his most canny shots is an image of a waiter skating at an ice rink. This photo was taken in 1932, at Grand Hotel, Switzerland. The waiter was asked to skate around a chair with a platter in one hand. This image is an example of Eisenstaedt’s excellence and humor.

In 1934, Eisenstaedt shot another great photograph. This image from Premiere at La Scala, Milan, portrays a young girl next to an empty box. His stills from 1944 are some of the touching images captured by him. He photographed American soldiers bidding farewells to their wives and folks. Eisenstaedt managed to captured these emotional images without acknowledging them yet these are among the best taken shots by him.

Alferd Eisenstaedt captured his most famous photograph on the celebration of Victory over Japan Day, August 14, 1945.  The day marks Japan’s surrender that ended the World War II, 1945. Eisenstaedt photographed an excited American sailor kissing a nurse at Times Square on VJ Day. The photograph was taken spontaneously but it seems like an excellent preplanned pose. The photograph became a cover for the Life Magazine.

Eisenstaedt has published many books including, Witness to Our Time (1966), this book comprises of the great work by Eisenstaedt covering historic figures like Hitler to the golden times of Hollywood, The Eye of Eisenstaedt (1969), Eisenstaedt’s Guide to Photography (1978), this book contain tips and guidance to master the art of photography, and Eisenstaedt: Germany (1981).

He had numerous exhibits and shows. The Encyclopedia Britannica and the University of Missouri School of Journalism named Alfred Eisenstaedt as the Photographer of the Year, 1951. He has been awarded with National Medal of Arts in 1989.

Eisenstaedt shot an image of Bill Clinton with his wife, Hillary Clinton and their daughter Chelsea in 1993. This image was taken at Martha’s Vineyard; it appeared in People’s Magazine, 13 September 1993.

The brilliant photographer of candid photography died on 24 August 1995 at Menemsha Inn Cottage, Pilot House, aged 1995.

Alfred Eisenstaedt is known as “The father of photojournalism” having a straightforward maxim: “Keep it simple!” Working with minimum equipment, Eisenstaedt was the master of candid photography; capturing such stunning casual moments that leave a profound effect on viewer.

German-born American photographer, Eisenstaedt was known as “Essie” among his close friend. He was born on 6 December 1898 in Dirschau, West Prussia, Imperial Germany. In 1906, his family moved to Berlin. Eisenstaedt was interested in photography from an early age. At the age of fourteen, Eisenstaedt received his first camera, Eastman Kodak Folding Camera. He joined German army to fight in World War I; he was wounded in 1918.

In 1920s, Eisenstaedt worked as button-and-belt salesperson. He started to work as a freelance photographer for the Pacific and Atlantic Photos, Berlin, 1928.  In 1929, Eisenstaedt became a full-time photographer. A German publication assigned him to cover Nobel Prize ceremonies.

A few years later, Eisenstaedt shot some of his famous historical photos. He captured a still of a meeting between Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini, Italy. In 1933, he came up with another distinguished yet famous still of Nazi propaganda politician, Joseph Goebbels, comrade of Hitler. In 1935, being a Jew, Eisenstaedt had to migrate to United States because of the Hitler domination.

In United States, Eisenstaedt settled in Jackson Heights, New York and worked as the staff photographer for Life Magazine, 1936. He was among the first four photojournalists hired by Life Magazine. He had produced around 90 covers for this magazine including stunning shots of Sophia Loren, Ernest Hemmingway and other famous figures and royalties.

Among his most canny shots is an image of a waiter skating at an ice rink. This photo was taken in 1932, at Grand Hotel, Switzerland. The waiter was asked to skate around a chair with a platter in one hand. This image is an example of Eisenstaedt’s excellence and humor.

In 1934, Eisenstaedt shot another great photograph. This image from Premiere at La Scala, Milan, portrays a young girl next to an empty box.

His stills from 1944 are some of the touching images captured by Eisenstaedt. He photographed American soldiers bidding farewells to their wives and folks. Eisenstaedt managed to captured these emotional images without acknowledging them yet these are among the best taken shots by him.

Eisenstaedt captured his most famous photograph on the celebration of Victory over Japan Day, August 14, 1945.  The day marks Japan’s surrender that ended the World War II, 1945. Eisenstaedt photographed an excited American sailor kissing a nurse at Times Square on VJ Day. The photograph was taken spontaneously but it seems like an excellent preplanned pose. The photograph became a cover for the Life Magazine.

Eisenstaedt has written many books including, Witness to Our Time (1966), this book comprises of the great work by Eisenstaedt covering historic figures like Hitler to the golden times of Hollywood, The Eye of Eisenstaedt (1969), Eisenstaedt’s Guide to Photography (1978), this book contain tips and guidance to master the art of photography, and Eisenstaedt: Germany (1981).

He had numerous exhibits and shows. The Encyclopedia Britannica and the University of Missouri School of Journalism named Eisenstaedt as the Photographer of the Year, 1951. He has been awarded with National Medal of Arts in 1989.

Alferd Eisenstaedt shot an image of Bill Clinton with his wife, Hillary Clinton and their daughter Chelsea in 1993. This image was taken at Martha’s Vineyard; it appeared in People’s Magazine, 13 September 1993.

The brilliant photographer of candid photography died on 24 August 1995 at Menemsha Inn Cottage, Pilot House, aged 96.


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